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Lessons in the Lutheran Confessions
“Conceived by the Holy Spirit”

Index of Scripture Graphics and posts by Scripture reference 

John 6:6–65

From the Confessions: The Apostles' Creed

“He was conceived by the Holy Spirit.”

Pulling It Together

Even in the conception of Jesus in the womb of Mary we see that human works had no play. Mary did nothing. Joseph surely did nothing. The poor man was very likely stunned at the news of Mary's pregnancy. Jesus was formed in the uterus of Mary by divine agency alone. The power of the Most High God overshadowed her and that was that (Luke 1:35). This we confess to believe, as unreasonable or difficult as it may seem to some. And in this doctrine, we are professing that Jesus is at once God and man. For Mary carried the child while the Spirit of God did the conceiving.

"We must note this well, for we see here that our works are impotent. Christ our Lord is neither your work nor mine, but He was conceived by the Holy Spirit and born of the Virgin Mary. I had no hand in this. I did not carve Him out of wood or bake Him with dough. He is God’s and Mary’s Son. I contributed nothing. And yet He says: 'He who believes in Me has eternal life; he shall have it.' Thus we will not reconcile God or be justified by our good works, but only by our faith in Him" (Luther’s Works, vol 23, p 108).

Prayer: Thank you, God, for giving me what I could never gain, eternal life in your Son. Amen.

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"Three Keys to What Lutherans Believe" is a three-session introduction to themes in Lutheran theology. By focusing on key biblical concepts, it demonstrates the primary themes that Lutherans emphasize in thinking about the Christian faith and the teachings of Scripture. The study may be particularly suited to new member classes, adult baptismal or confirmation instruction, or for use with young adults. For use in shorter sessions, leaders may choose to divide each lesson into two parts to create a six-week study.


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